here are a list of my academic publications:
Britain, David, Tamsin Blaxter & Adrian Leemann. Forthcoming. “Retention and loss of traditional dialect in England: evidence from the English Dialects App.” In A. Thibault, M. Avanzi and A. Millour (eds.), New ways of analysing dialectal variation. Amsterdam: Benjamins.forthcoming
Blaxter, Tamsin & David Britain. 2021. “Hands off the metadata!: Comparing the use of explicit and background metadata in crowdsourced dialectology.” Linguistics Vanguard 7(s1). DOI: 10.1515/lingvan-2019-0029January 2021
Burridge, James & Tamsin Blaxter. 2020. “Using spatial patterns of English folk speech to infer the universality class of linguistic copying.” Physical Review Research 2(4):043053. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevResearch.2.043053.October 2020
Britain, David, Tamsin Blaxter & Adrian Leemann. 2020. “East Anglian English in the English Dialects App: Regional variation in East Anglian English based on evidence from a smartphone-based survey.” English Today 36(3):14-30. doi:10.1017/S0266078420000206September 2020
Jansen, Sandra, Justyna A Robinson, Lynne Cahill, Adrian Leemann, Tamsin Blaxter & David Britain. “Sussex by the sea: A descriptive analysis of dialect variation in the South East of England based on English Dialect App data.” English Today 36(3):31-39. doi:10.1017/S0266078420000218September 2020
Burridge, J., T. Blaxter & B. Vaux. “Evolutionary paths of language.” Europhysics Letters 128:28003. DOI: 10.1209/0295-5075/128/28003.January 2020
Blaxter, Tam. 2019. “Ther varom mid j hia: Tracing linguistic diffusion in the history of Norwegian using kernel density estimation.” Dialectologia et Geolinguistica 27.1:5-34. DOI: 10.1515/dialect-2019-0002November 2019
Leemann, A., T. Blaxter, D. Britain & K. Earnshaw. 2019. “The FACE of Change in English Dialects: 1950 v 2018.” Proceedings of ICPhS 2019:373-377.August 2019
Benjamin William Gittelson, Adrian Leemann, Fabian Tomaschek, Tam Blaxter, David Britain. forthcoming. “Socially constrained variation in nonmodal phonation for more than 2,500 speakers of British English.” Preprint at PsyArXiv.May 2019
Blaxter, Tam & Richard Coates. 2019. “The TRAP-BATH split in Bristol English. English Language and Linguistics. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S136067431900008XApril 2019
Blaxter, Tam & Peter Trudgill. 2019. On case loss and svarabhakti vowels: the sociolinguistic typology and geolinguistics of simplification in North Germanic.” Journal of Linguistic Geography 7.1:1-13. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/jlg.2019.3April 2019
Blaxter, Tam, Kate Beeching, Richard Coates, James Murphy & Emily Robinson. 2019. “Each p[ɚ]son does it th[ɛː] way: Rhoticity variation and the community grammar.” Language Variation and Change 31.1:91-117. DOI: 10.1017/S0954394519000048March 2019
Blaxter, Tam & David Willis. 2018. “Pragmatic differentiation of negative markers in the early stages of Jespersen’s cycle in North Germanic.” Diachronica 35.4. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1075/dia.16040.bla.December 2018
Blaxter, Tam & Kari Kinn. 2018. “On ek and jak in Middle Norwegian: Mixed methods in historical sociolinguistics.” Transactions of the Philological Society 2018:1-27. DOI: 10.1111/1467-968X.12126April 2018
Blaxter, Tam. 2017. Speech in space and time: Contact, change and diffusion in medieval Norway. PhD thesis, University of Cambridge. DOI: 10.17863/CAM.15576.November 2017
Blaxter, Tam & David Willis. 2017. “Pragmatic differentiation of negative markers in the early stages of Jespersen’s cycle in North Germanic.” Working papers in Scandinavian Syntax 98:105-130.June 2017
Blaxter, Tam. 2015. “Gender and language change in Old Norse sentential negatives.” Language Variation and Change 27.3:349–375. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0954394515000125October 2015
Blaxter, Tam. 2014. “Applying keyword analysis to gendered language in the Íslendingasögur.” Nordic Journal of Linguistics 37:169–198. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0332586514000171October 2014
Blaxter, Tam. 2013. Sociolinguistic variation in the Old Icelandic Family Sagas. MPhil thesis, University of Oxford.June 2013
Blaxter, Tam. 2010. ‘We still talk Cadbury Heath.’ A quantitative study of rhoticity in Bristol English. BA dissertation, University of Essex.June 2010